The path to pragmatism; making psychology useful

I had difficulty in trying to write over the last several months. On one hand I felt what I was communicating was helpful to me and those who read it, but in my own journey I began to find the things I was writing about as increasingly vague and unhelpful.

I try not to be overly critical of myself, and certainly at the time I wrote them, they felt correct and beneficial. It was difficult to go back and try to find practical meaning and something useful in much of it, and so I felt the need to do a little bit of a reset.

An Imaginary Journey

“I just want to go on my hero’s journey and get out of my comfort zone and overcome my fears and be a super successful entrepreneur that changes the world.” (perhaps a little over-dramatic.)

If you ask such a person, “what do you mean by that?” you’ll likely get something like “Well I’m tired of doing the 9-5, I’ve gotta connect to my life’s purpose and do what makes my heart sing.” (I’ll admit that one made me gag a little as I wrote it out.)

How many times would you have to ask “what do you mean by that?” before a person can give you a real concrete answer on what they want to do and why? You might actually never get such a concrete answer.

Hello Logic, My Old Friend

There is a stigma in spiritual circles about focusing only on what is rational and pragmatic, because the spirit is in the heart and it’s about emotion! And yet you’ll be making your daily choices that bring  you closer to your ideal reality with your seemingly “outdated” logic brain.

Even frequently used spiritual terms like “collective consciousness” and “true self” were developed by Carl Jung, a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. I am not invalidating them, but merely saying the path to them will not come through vague ideas and concepts that cannot possibly manifest into the real world.

We all know things we could be doing today to improve our lives, we know things we could stop doing to improve our lives. Feeling guilty for not doing the good or not dropping the bad isn’t particularly helpful though.

In the posts to come, I hope to meaningfully communicate those more pragmatic life lessons I’ve picked up that have helped move my life more in the direction of “generally enjoyable”.

 

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